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Thailand and SE Asia’s first Pint of Science Festival kicked Pint-of-Science1 off on Mon 15 May with a look at Killer Bugs: Disease, Detection and Destruction and an enthusiastic reception from over 50 attendees that included scientists from MORU and other institutions, business people with a background in science and students.

3 speakers in Pint of Science

Hosted by MORU’s Phaik Yeong Cheah and Sandy Sachaphimukh, the sold-out evening featured lively presentations from MORU’s Markus Winterberg (Applied Proteomics: A Short Story of Cake and Urine); LOMWRU’S Matt Robinson (Bac Chat) and Direk Limmathurotsakul, who spoke on his initiative, Antibiotic Footprint in Thailand. The evening’s discussions ranged from how monks bless a mass-spectrometer and the amount of antibiotics fed to chickens in Thailand to a how a bacterium named Bob makes decisions.

Held 15-17 May at FabCafé Bangkok and open to all, Pint of Science Thailand gave the public and participating scientists a chance to meet and directly engage with each other on a variety of topics in a lively, informative manner in both English and Thai.

Presenters at first Pint of Science Thailand: MORU's Dr Markus Winterberg, Dr Matt Robinson and Dr Direk Limmathurotsakul. © MORU 2017 photos Nicky Almasy.

Despite the sudden rain storm just before kick-off, FabCafé was once again jam-packed Tues 16 May as Olivo Miotto hosted the 2nd evening, The Hidden Secrets of Epidemics and Evolution.

Noel Hidalgo Tan of SEAMEO SPAFA kicked off the evening with Crouching Tiger, Hidden Elephants: The unseen cave paintings of Southeast Asia, a 'Buddhas versus elephants' guessing game and a story of hidden cave art in South-East Asia.

Noel was followed by MORU MAEMOD’s Wirichada (Pan) Pan-ngum and Lisa White‘s The Outbreak Breakout, a hands-on disease modelling exercise that everyone joined in. Mahidol’s Narupat Hongdilokkul closed the night with Evolution Director, a look at how evolution works.

On Wed 17 May, LOMWRU’s Matt Robinson MC’d the final Pint of Science Thailand evening, Tackling Diseases of the Past and Present. Well received and another full house, the evening included the Identify the famous scientist game – and 2 lucky winners who got to take home the much-coveted limited edited Pint of Science Thailand T-shirt.

Jittiporn Chaisaingmongkol of the Chulaborn Research Institute led off with Precision Medicine in Cancer: How to Make your Gene Talk, a look at personalised medicine for cancer treatment. MORU’s Bipin Adhikari followed with his history, Leprosy: Discovered by a Norwegian, Still Causing Problems Today. With a little help from Marvin Gaye, Andrea Rücker of MORU closed with The Sex Lives of Malaria Parasites.

Much fun was had by all, with many sad to see the end of a fruitful and entertaining festival.

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