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Organised by a grass-root community of thousands of scientists across the world, Pint of Science 2022 allows researchers in 25 countries and over 800 cities to share their latest findings with lay folk in interesting, informal settings. Lao PDR joined the global Pint of Science family on Monday 9 May, when the first-ever Pint of Science Laos kicked off!

Collage of photos taken during Pint of Science presentation in Vientiane, Laos PDR in May 2022

Laos joined the global Pint of Science family on Monday 9 May, when the first-ever Pint of Science Laos kicked off in Vientiane! 

Hats off to the Pint of Science Laos Team: Tamalee Roberts, Kaisone Padith, Vayouly Vidhamaly, Padthana Kiedsathid, Aphaphone Adsamouth, Latsaniphone Boutthasavong, Manophab Luangraj, and Bountoy Sibounheuang!

Led by LOMWRU’s Matt Robinson, the Pint of Science Laos team put together a full 2-day programme at Scipresso, Vientiane's only science-themed café. Hosted by Matt and Kaisone, the first night, Mon 9 May, saw talks on artificial intelligence and its use on Instagram beauty influencers, the life of the Lao warty newt, and we discovered what life is really like for a pathologist at the Cancer Center, Mittaphab Hospital. The second evening, Tues 10 May, hosted by Vilada Chansamouth and Latsaniphone, featured talks on biodiversity in the Mekong region, COVID-19 in Laos, and disease transmission by animals. A fun and entertaining time was had by all!

This year, Pint of Science is being held in 25 countries, and over 800 cities, between 9-11 May. We hope that Pint of Science Thailand will be able to go ahead very soon. No dates are set as yet, but we will announce it when possible.

 - Text and photos courtesy of Matt Robinson.

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