Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

MORU and SMRU were delighted and honoured to host the University of Oxford Vice-Chancellor Prof Louise Richardson and her party during her visit to Thailand on 1-4 September. Accompanying the Vice-Chancellor were Jeremy Woodall (Director of Development (Asia)), Frewyeni Kidane (Fundraiser for Southeast Asia), Cher Wu (Asia Development office) and Ed Gibbs (NDM Director of Finance and Operations).

Group photo of Vice-Chancellor Louise Richardson visiting MORU and SMRU

Vice-Chancellor Louise Richardson speaking with a researcherAfter landing in Bangkok on 1 Sept, the visitors flew to Mae Sot where they met with key staff from the SMRU programme. On 2 Sept, they visited the Wangpa Clinic, meeting with SMRU staff including midwives and local physicians, then went on to the SMRU offices in Mae Sod where they met office and laboratory researchers.

At the Faculty of Tropical Medicine on Tues 3r Sept, Vice-Chancellor Prof Richardson, Mr Woodall, Ms Kidane, Ms Wu and Mr Gibbs were welcomed by the Faculty Dean, Assoc Prof Pratap Singhasivanon. They then went on a tour of MORU departments and laboratories, meeting and chatting to many MORU and Faculty staff members. The visit was rounded off with a fantastic lunch hosted by the Dean and attended by many Faculty of Tropical Medicine Ajarns.

Vice-Chancellor Louise Richardson speaking with healthcare officialsThe following day Prof Richardson visited the Mahidol University campus at Salaya, meeting Prof Banchong Mahaisavariya, Acting President of Mahidol, and other senior Mahidol academics and discussing potential areas of collaboration between the two universities.”

- Text by Nick Day, with thanks to Rose McGready, Primprapaporn (Prim) Thongdee, Pawinee (Joy) Pawthong and David Burton for photos

Similar stories

Pilot study detects diverse DNA in ingredients of falsified tablets

A recent multidisciplinary pilot study, originating from LOMWRU and the Medicine Quality Research Group of IDDO and MORU, investigated whether bacterial, plant, fungal and animal DNA in the ingredients and from the environment (eDNA) could be detected from falsified (aka counterfeit) tablets.

COPCOV investigators meet, and prepare to submit for publication

On 15-16 Dec, COPCOV investigators from around the world met in Bangkok to review study results and plan next steps. Led by co-PIs Prof Sir Nick White and Dr Will Schilling, and funded by the Wellcome Trust, the MORU-led COPCOV ( Chloroquine prevention of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the healthcare setting) is the world’s largest multinational trial of COVID-19 prevention.

Researchers call for antimicrobial resistance surveillance to be improved

The number of studies reporting antimicrobial resistance (AMR) data has increased in Africa, South and South East Asia according to new research in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Are we getting tafenoquine dosing right?

Researchers analysing clinical trial data for the new antimalarial drug tafenoquine find that higher doses are needed to cure reliably vivax malaria infection.

New SMRU building opened in Thailand to provide health care to marginalized populations

The inauguration of a new joint Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) and Borderland Health Foundation (BHF) Building took place in Mae Ramat, Thailand, this week.

Constant genetic surveillance necessary to keep multidrug-resistant malaria parasite strains in check, study finds

Continually monitoring malaria parasite populations is necessary to prevent outbreaks of previously dormant multidrug-resistant malaria strains, say University of Oxford researchers. Multidrug-resistant malaria parasite strains can rapidly grow or collapse in response to public health policy changes, say the researchers in a study published today in The Lancet.