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The inaugural competition for this prize is a Student Poster Competition, which will be held at MORU Bangkok, between 11am-2pm on Monday 30th November 2015 in the Similan Room. Niklas was a great advocate of student activity, and supervised numerous students as part of his role as Head of Pharmacology.

Joel Tarning with a group of MORU Students

We are pleased to announce the launch of a new annual prize. The Niklas Lindegårdh Memorial Student Prize is in honour of our former colleague.

We invite all MORU students to submit a poster, and if possible, to be present on the day to discuss their work and poster with MORU colleagues and staff. There will be a voting system in place for the best poster, and the winner, who will be announced at 4pm on the day, will receive a certificate, trophy and gift voucher.

If you wish to enter the Niklas Lindegårdh competition, please register your interest by email before Monday 23rd November to Sawanya (Aeh) Anumas. Good luck to all!

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