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Data sharing is increasingly required by academic journals and funders of research, and the benefits of sharing participant level clinical research data for secondary or meta-analysis are widely championed among the research community. However, there is a need to ensure that data sharing is truly useful and that those with limited research capacity are not inadvertently disadvantaged.

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New study alerts to the risk of poor quality medicines used to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease

There are important but neglected issues with substandard and falsified medicines and medical products used to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. From limited available data, MORU and IDDO scientists found about one fifth of medicines reported as sampled in the literature were substandard or falsified. This systematic review suggests that more and better quality data and data sharing are needed to better understand the global burden of this problem and inform interventions.

Oxford and Oracle partner to speed identification of COVID-19 variants

The fast spread of the highly infectious Delta variant underscores the need for faster identification of COVID-19 mutations. Uniting governments and medical communities in this challenge, the University of Oxford and Oracle’s Global Pathogen Analysis System (GPAS) is now being used by organizations on nearly every continent. Institutions using the platform include OUCRU in Vietnam and institutions in Canada, Chile, Australia and the UK. GPAS is also now part of the Public Health England New Variant Assessment Platform.

Systematic review identifies research gaps for Chagas disease

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Oxford retains top spot in world rankings for sixth consecutive year

The University of Oxford remains top of the table in latest Times Higher Education World University Rankings. In a year dominated by the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, the rankings reflect the vital role of universities in understanding and managing the crisis as a number of institutions around the world saw significant boosts in their citation scores from Covid-19 focused research.

The scale of the problem of visceral leishmaniasis in pregnancy is underestimated

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RECOVERY Trial announced as overall winner of Best COVID-19 Response Project Award in the UK

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