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Resistance to antibiotics is one of the key challenges to healthcare this century. Tackling it will require sweeping changes to antibiotic use in animals⁠—and researchers from Oxford University Clinical Research Unit are rising to the challenge in Vietnam, with a rigorous test of programmes among farmers.

Antibiotic resistance (AMR) is one of this century’s biggest healthcare challenges. In Vietnam, the AMR rate is among the highest in Asia. One reason for this high rate of AMR is excessive and inappropriate usage of antimicrobials in poultry production. When AMR resistant bacteria show up in poultry, they can also be transmitted to humans, leading to infections in people that are very hard to treat.

Recognizing this problem, researchers at OUCRU have worked with farmers in a project called ViParc– which stands for Vietnamese Platform for Antimicrobial Reduction in Chicken production. Started in 2016, this project aims to reduce the reliance on antibiotics in livestock production. We hope that the project will raise the awareness of farmers and share an important message ‘healthy chickens do not need antibiotics’. Healthy livestock, healthy community!

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