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Background:In Nepal, knowledge of proper handling, management and causes of cattle diseases is still limited. The main objective of this study was to explore the impact of deworming on milk production and its effect on milk qualities. Methods:A total of 200 faecal samples (100 buffaloes and 100 cows) were collected and analysed for parasitic burden. Half of the infected cattle (buffaloes, Bos bubalis; cow native, B indicus; European, B taurus) were then dewormed with Levamisole Hydrochloride-Oxyclozanide bolus, and the remaining 50 per cent were left untreated. The milk yield from both infected and dewormed cattle was recorded for 30 days and the qualities of milk were analysed. Results:The prevalence of parasitic infection was found to be 22.0 per cent. Fasciola hepatica was the predominant parasite (81.8 per cent), followed by Toxocara vitulorum (34.1 per cent), Strongyloides papillosus (6.8 per cent) and Bunostomum phlebotomum (4.5 per cent). The average milk yield (litre/day/cow) significantly increased, which was 1.22 litres per day for treated cows and 1.06 litres for treated buffaloes. The intervention effect of deworming among cows was 0.79 (14.06 per cent increment) and for buffaloes was 0.42 (8.32 per cent increment). After deworming the infected cattle, the protein percentage was significantly improved in cows (P=0.035), whereas the lactose percentage and solid percentage had increased significantly in buffaloes (P=0.002 and P=0.028). Conclusion:Antiparasitic treatment in cattle had positive effects on milk qualities such as solid non-fat, lactose, solid percentage and total protein percentage.

Original publication

DOI

10.1136/vetreco-2019-000380

Type

Journal

Veterinary record open

Publication Date

09/01/2020

Volume

7

Addresses

Central Department of Microbiology, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Nepal.