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<jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title> <jats:p>Acute central nervous system (CNS) infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality, but the etiology remains unknown in a large proportion of cases. We identified and characterized the full genome of a novel cyclovirus (tentatively named cyclovirus-Vietnam [CyCV-VN]) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens of two Vietnamese patients with CNS infections of unknown etiology. CyCV-VN was subsequently detected in 4% of 642 CSF specimens from Vietnamese patients with suspected CNS infections and none of 122 CSFs from patients with noninfectious neurological disorders. Detection rates were similar in patients with CNS infections of unknown etiology and those in whom other pathogens were detected. A similar detection rate in feces from healthy children suggested food-borne or orofecal transmission routes, while high detection rates in feces from pigs and poultry (average, 58%) suggested the existence of animal reservoirs for such transmission. Further research is needed to address the epidemiology and pathogenicity of this novel, potentially zoonotic virus.</jats:p> <jats:p> <jats:bold>IMPORTANCE</jats:bold> Acute central nervous system (CNS) infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality, but the etiology frequently remains unknown, which hampers development of therapeutic or preventive strategies. Hence, identification of novel pathogens is essential and is facilitated by current next-generation sequencing-based methods. Using such technology, we identified and characterized the full genome of a novel cyclovirus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from two Vietnamese patients with CNS infections of unknown etiology, which was subsequently detected in none of 122 CSF specimens from patients with noninfectious neurological disorders but 4% of 642 CSF specimens from Vietnamese patients with suspected or confirmed CNS infections. Similar detection rates in feces from healthy children suggested food-borne or orofecal transmission routes, while frequent detection in feces from Vietnamese pigs and poultry (average, 58%) suggested the existence of animal reservoirs for such transmission. Further studies are needed to address the epidemiology and pathogenicity of this novel, potentially zoonotic virus.</jats:p>

Original publication

DOI

10.1128/mbio.00231-13

Type

Journal article

Journal

mBio

Publisher

American Society for Microbiology

Publication Date

18/06/2013

Volume

4