Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Both neutralising antibody and interferon play a part in protection of animals against death from rabies virus infection. Interferon induction was therefore sought in 53 volunteers within 24 hours of receiving human diploid cell strain vaccine or fetal bovine kidney cell vaccine given either intramuscularly or intradermally. Repeat observations were made in 18 subjects following a second dose of vaccine seven days later. No interferon was detected in any sample tested although no subject had any detectable rabies neutralising antibody on day 0. The sensitivity of the interferon assay, and comparison with other studies are discussed. An interferon inducer suitable for human use should be sought as an alternative to, or a replacement for, passive rabies immunization.

Type

Journal article

Journal

The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health

Publication Date

12/1985

Volume

16

Pages

521 - 524

Keywords

Humans, Interferons, Rabies Vaccines, Antibodies, Viral, Immunization, Adolescent, Adult, Middle Aged, Male