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Farah Jawitz (cohort 2018-19) examines the hazards of health professionals' extended shifts in South Africa. The paper proposes a series of measures to manage the risks of extended working hours.

Doctor putting PPE on © <a href='https://www.freepik.com/photos/medical'>Medical photo created by freepik - www.freepik.com</a>
Doctor wearing personal protective equipment (PPE)

"Research on the impact of fatigue presents compelling evidence that extended shifts increase the risk of harm to patients and practitioners. However, where the number of doctors is limited and their workloads are not easily reduced, there are numerous barriers to reform."

Read the full article: Doctors’ Extended Shifts as Risk to Practitioner and Patient: South Africa as a Case Study on the MDPI website

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