Latest News

tGHN and ISARIC Develop a Zika virus information platform

tGHN and ISARIC Develop a Zika virus information platform

Posted 27/01/2016

Zika virus is a rapidly emerging vector-born flavivirus, with potential to spread to new areas where the vector Aedes mosquitos are present.

The aim of the website, developed by the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Infection Consortium (ISARIC) and hosted by the Global Health Network (tGHN), is to provide a platform for sharing and developing research priorities, protocols and data capture systems alongside the latest epidemiological and clinical management information about Zika infection.  

[Photo: Prof. Frank Hadley Collins, Dir., Cntr. for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, Univ. of Notre Dame, CDC. Aedes Aegypti mosquito feeding.]

Researching Zika

Researching Zika

Posted 25/01/2016

The Oxford University Science Blog features a Q&A with Professor Trudie Lang, who heads the Global Health Network. The interview discusses why it is important to build research capacity in places where research doesn't normally happen, and how the response to Zika outbreak has learnt from the Ebola clinical trials. 

Chemotherapy for Tuberculous Meningitis

Chemotherapy for Tuberculous Meningitis

Posted 25/01/2016
Researchers from the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Vietnam have completed what is probably the largest ever controlled trial of tuberculous meningitis. The study is published in the New England Journal of Medicine
Millions at risk of little known deadly tropical disease

Millions at risk of little known deadly tropical disease

Posted 12/01/2016

Melioidosis, a difficult to diagnose deadly bacterial disease, is likely to be present in many more countries than previously thought, reports a paper published online today in the journal Nature Microbiology. The study predicts that melioidosis is present in 79 countries, including 34 that have never reported the disease.

Survivors' blood plasma to treat Ebola is safe but more data needed

Survivors' blood plasma to treat Ebola is safe but more data needed

Posted 08/01/2016
There are currently no effective treatments for Ebola, but blood plasma from people who have survived Ebola may be one potential treatment: this component of blood may contain antibodies that likely helped survivors successfully fight off the disease.
Légion d’Honneur to François Nosten

Légion d’Honneur to François Nosten

Posted 06/01/2016

On 14 Dec, Mr Gilles Garachon, the French Ambassador to Thailand, arrived at Mae Sot in Thailand to present France’s highest award, l'Ordre National de la Légion d’honneur, to Professor François Nosten, Head of MORU’s Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU). The award is in recognition of Professsor Nosten's work over three decades fighting malaria.

New route to malaria vaccine?

New route to malaria vaccine?

Posted 23/12/2015

Researchers from the KEMRI Wellcome Trust programme in Kenya have uncovered some of the molecular processes through which some people appear to be naturally immune to malaria. Understanding these processes could help suggest new approaches to a malaria vaccine.

Dr Julie Makani one of ten 'African science heroes'

Dr Julie Makani one of ten 'African science heroes'

Posted 17/12/2015

Dr Julie Makani has been recognized for her work on anaemia and sickle cell disease by the Planet Earth Institute, an international NGO and charity working for the scientific independent of Africa. Dr Makani was amongst the organization end-of-year list of the 'ten most inspirational people working in and passionate about science on the (African) continent.'

Tackling antimicrobial resistance

Tackling antimicrobial resistance

Posted 18/11/2015

To coincide with the 2015 World Antibiotic Awareness Week, Professor Philip Guerin contributes to a series in The Lancet, examining whether the global fight against antimicrobial resistance is under threat.

Less effective antimalarial therapies can help fight malaria better

Less effective antimalarial therapies can help fight malaria better

Posted 12/11/2015

A computer simulation study led by Professor Maciej Boni from the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit suggests that most effective way to save lives from malaria, while still limiting the spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites, is to simultaneously use non-artemisinin therapy amongst more effective artemisinin-based combinations.