Latest News

Bill and Melinda Gates visit Palin

Bill and Melinda Gates visit Palin

Posted 08/07/2014

In April 2014, Bill and Melinda Gates visited the Targeted Malaria Elimination (TME) study in Palin, Cambodia. The TME study is a collaboration between MORU and the Cambodian National Malaria Control Program and assesses the epidemiology and role of treatment of subclinical falciparum malaria. The visit was hosted by MORU’s Prof Arjen Dondorp, Drs Rupam Tripura and Tom Peto. The Gates Foundation has played a role in pushing the malaria elimination agenda and has also contributed to the funding of the TME studies in South-East Asia.

Dr Philip Bejon appointed as Director of KEMRI-Wellcome Trust research programme

Dr Philip Bejon appointed as Director of KEMRI-Wellcome Trust research programme

Posted 02/06/2014

Dr Philip Bejon will take over the role of Director of KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme from 1 September 2014. His appointment follows the decision by outgoing Director Professor Kevin Marsh to leave the programme and work with a range of African and UK-partnered institutions to strengthen scientific capacity in Africa. Dr Bejon is a clinical epidemiologist and has been working with the programme the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme since 2002, specialising in vaccine development.

SMRU researchers fight malaria resistance

SMRU researchers fight malaria resistance

Posted 06/06/2014

Professor François Nosten, SMRU's director, has studied malaria near where the disease first became drug resistant, for three decades. He believes that in order to stop it spreading to India and Africa, it's essential to chase the parasite into Burma's forests and pre-emptively treat even people who may not be ill. Prof Nosten explains that as malaria rates decline, the strongest and most resistant strains of the parasite survive and spread. "It has always happened like this in the past, there's no reason to think this time will be any different."

Dr. Faith Osier Named Winner of Fifth Annual Merle A. Sande Health Leadership Award

Dr. Faith Osier Named Winner of Fifth Annual Merle A. Sande Health Leadership Award

Posted 25/03/2014

Dr. Faith Osier named winner of the Fith Annual Merle A. Sande Health Leadership AwardAccordia Global Health Foundation is pleased to name Dr. Faith Osier as the 2014 recipient of the prestigious Merle A. Sande Health Leadership Award.  An external selection committee convened by Accordia chose Dr. Osier to receive the award, from a large pool ...

Public Lecture: Making global health better

Public Lecture: Making global health better

Posted 25/02/2014

How can we help people make well-informed choices about their own health? Hear from some of the world’s leading experts as they ask what we can learn from healthcare in other parts of the world. Book your free ticket on Science Oxford Live website. Thursday 27th February 2014 6pm Speakers Professor Andy Oxman, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Oslo Professor Sasha Shepperd, Nuffield Department of Population Health, Oxford Dr Newton Opiyo, Oxford-KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Nairobi

Public Engagement Award

Public Engagement Award

Posted 17/02/2014

In a small ceremony held on Thursday the 30th of January at the NDM’s outreach Lunchtime Taster Session, Professor Sir Peter Ratcliffe awarded the inaugural Head of Department Prize for Public Engagement to Dr Katharine Plant. The prize was established by NDM Strategic to recognise the efforts of a researcher (or researchers) who have gone above-and-beyond to contribute to public engagement.

Public engagement lunchtime taster sessions

Public engagement lunchtime taster sessions

Posted 27/01/2014

For those who are interested in getting involved in Public Engagement - but not quite sure what to expect - the NDM Strategic team, along with some of the Department's finest volunteers, will be holding two taster sessions in January. Come along to the ORCRB . . . . . . .

NDM Honorary Research Fellow Julie Makani gives an interview on her work in Sickle cell Disease

NDM Honorary Research Fellow Julie Makani gives an interview on her work in Sickle cell Disease

Posted 27/01/2014

Dr Julie Makani is a Clinical Research Fellow in the Nuffield Department of Medicine and is based in the Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (www.muhas.ac.tz), which is the main clinical, academic and research centre in Tanzania. Dr Julie Makani Dr Julie Makani What is Sickle Cell Disease? It is an inherited blood disease that affects the red blood cells. There is a wide spectrum of symptoms despite the fact that it is exactly the same genetic mutation that causes SCD

International Podcasts

International Podcasts

Posted 12/12/2013

Microbiology in Thailand by Stuart Blacksell From his research group in Thailand, Dr Stuart Blacksell discusses improving the accuracy and the rapidity of tropical infection diagnosis in the field. Q: How good is the diagnosis of tropical infections in rural South-East Asia? SB: Unfortunately it is not so good; where we can actually demonstrate the infectious agent such as a bacteria, a virus or a fungus, it’s not too bad. However, it can be quite time consuming and expensive. The normal requirement is to grow the agent on something like a bacterial agar, or to use some sort of molecular method such as a polymerase chain reaction to indirectly demonstrate the presence of the infectious agent.

PODCAST: Daniel Paris: Rickettsial Disease

PODCAST: Daniel Paris: Rickettsial Disease

Posted 27/11/2013

From his research centre in Bangkok, Dr Daniel Paris tells us about the challenges posed by Rickettsia to rural populations in South East Asia. Q: What are Rickettsia? DP: Rickettsia are gram-negative obligate intra-cellular bacteria; they live within cells, they can’t live outside cells, and they cause a disease called typhus. There are many different forms of Rickettsia, but the interesting thing about these bacteria is that they are transmitted by different vectors: they are transmitted by ticks, lice, fleas, chigger mites, all these small little etymological creatures. This makes it extremely interesting.